• More than 240 000 orders per year
  • Customer service in 3 languages
The product was added to your shopping cart.
Go to shopping cart

Engine valve with permanent magnet

How to simulate the workings of an engine valve
Author: Bernard Le Gall, Landerneau, France
Online since: 02/07/2009, Number of visits: 71855
0
It is often mentioned that the valve of an internal combustion engine could also be controlled with electromagnets. So I asked myself: Why, then, not use permanent magnets?
Even though my approach doesn’t solve the problem, my two methods might still make some readers want to verify the results for themselves.
Those who try it will certainly come up with other, similar attempts at a solution very quickly. It is entertaining and may even lead to useful applications.


Classic concept:

  • The cam (1) rotates clockwise.
  • The valve lifter moves up and down.
  • The stroke of the cam (C) depends on how much the cam is tilting.

Magnetic concept:

It is unbelievable how fast the "magnet valve" moves up and down, depending on whether it is being attracted or repelled.
Here you can see the concept one more time: The ring magnet (1) sits on the shaft that is operated with a crank (4). If the poles of the ring magnet and the "valve magnet" are different, the "valve magnet" is being attracted; if the polarity is the same, it is lifted. It looks as if the magnet temporarily floats.

Initial approach

I realised this concept with simple means. The ring magnet was placed on the aluminium shaft and secured. The shaft was pushed through the holes in the base (grey). The pawn-shaped magnet moves up and down inside a syringe barrel.
Caution: The two magnets should never be allowed to collide directly, or else they will quickly break. That’s why I closed the bottom of the barrel with acrylic glass.
Here, the pawn magnet is attracted...
Here, the pawn magnet is attracted...
...and repelled after another half turn.
...and repelled after another half turn.

Second approach

In a second attempt, I replaced the ring magnet with two diametrically magnetised disc magnets type S-10-05-DN.
These were glued to two plywood blocks.
The idea: The magnets (3) in the disc (2) rotate on a base (1). After half a turn, the magnets (3) attract the diametrically magnetised magnets (4), at which point the two "jaws" close. As soon as the disc is turned further, the jaws separate again under their own weight. Braces on the outside of the jaws prevent them from splitting too far apart. Otherwise, they would no longer be attracted to the magnets on the disc.
Here too, the disc is rotated by hand via a shaft
Here too, the disc is rotated by hand via a shaft
The magnets on the edge are attracted - the jaws close
The magnets on the edge are attracted - the jaws close
The jaws tilt apart because the magnets on the disc are rotated away
The jaws tilt apart because the magnets on the disc are rotated away
I hope that the readers of this experiment will come up with their own applications - be it purely playful or practical.
I wish you every success with the "machines of the future"!

The entire content of this site is protected by copyright.
Copying the content or using it elsewhere is not permitted without explicit approval.